VMS VA/VE Capital Improvement Studies

Value Studies

VMS was founded on the principles of the Value Methodology. The VM can be applied to any problem or process, but value studies are at the core of our business. We offer the following types of value studies, but our list of applications is continuously growing with every new project and organizational challenge we encounter. Contact VMS to reap the benefits of a VE study (or even a series of VE studies) for your project or program.


VE Capital Improvement Studies

Value Engineering studies have long been recognized as an effective technique to lower the government’s cost while maintaining necessary quality levels. In fact, most major capital improvement projects require VE studies to comply with federal (OMB Circular A-131) and state funding requirements due to its proven track record for yielding a large return on investment. VMS regularly delivers ROIs as much as 100:1 for the California Department of Transportation – and sometimes significantly more impressive than that! VMS team leaders have directed VE studies on over 2,000 design and construction projects since 1990. These projects have ranged in size from $400,000 to over $3 billion.

Each VA/VE study facilitated by VMS follows the six-phase, sequential Value Methodology Job Plan – Information, Function, Speculation, Evaluation, Development, and Presentation. (VMS adds a seventh phase: Implementation.) Integral to this process is VMS’s Value Metrics process, which emphasizes the interrelationship between cost and performance and can be quantified and compared in terms of how they contribute to overall value.

These are the kinds of capital improvement projects VMS optimizes every day:

  • Transportation
  • Military
  • Education
  • Water/Wastewater
  • Waterfront/Navigation
  • Civil Works
  • Environmental
  • Healthcare
  • Government

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Capital Project Planning Studies

More to come.

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Master Planning Studies

More to come.

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Charrettes

Charrettes are conducted very early for projects to identify and resolve issues of functionality, location, scope, and cost that might affect execution of the project. Design Charrettes involve a process where designers, users and decision makers come together and focus their input on the design of a specific project. This process maximizes the customer’s access to the designer and the designer’s access to the site during design development. The design team receives functional information from the customer and other stakeholders, so more alternatives can be explored, resulting in the best possible design solution. The result is more accurately defined project design and construction schedules and more effective cost management through reduced lost design and construction changes.

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Functional Analysis Concept Development (FACD)

Having facilitated hundreds of Charrettes and FACDs, VMS is very well versed in the necessary steps needed to ensure a successful project. The FACD process combines value engineering methodology with systems design and partnering in an architectural charrette type format. Created by NAVFAC in the 1990s, this process is widely used to develop requirements and concepts for new and renovated facilities. FACDs can be performed at the planning and design stages, ensuring that cost, schedule, and budget area aligned with users’ expectations and constraints.VMS typically facilitates five and ten-day processes. The full ten-day process is used for both planning and design phases, and allows for a concept design to be developed based on the functional needs of the user. The five-day FACD is typically used to validate a design that has already transitioned to the concept level, but requires revisiting to validate or confirm functional appropriateness, design constraints or assumptions, or funding limitations.

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Product Studies

Competing in the marketplace is not just developing and launching products. Value, which consists of price as well as cost, has to remain the focus to be competitive with others offering products of varied features and functions in that same market space. It has been shown the best way to keep this focus is to understand the competitors, their products, and processes used to manufacture and assemble these products.The best way to do this is to follow the best practice in the world, Value Analysis Tear-Down. Developed in Japan over the last 40 years, the purpose of the VA Tear-Down process is to analyze and understand the competitive advantages of your own and competing products. Some may call this competitive benchmarking, which is a part of the process, but VA Tear-Down is much more than just benchmarking. The process can also help establish product improvement goals; stimulate innovation; and improve product function, features, and attributes in direct competition with a given competitor’s product.

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Value Program Development & Management

More to come.

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